Religion

Pictured:  Christmas at Hawfields,,copyright Annette Fulp, 1976.

The Scots-Irish settlers—including the Scott family—brought with them their staunch Presbyterian faith and traditions. Within the first few years of settlement, the community established formal congregations for worship and fellowship. Integral to the Scott family was their home church, Hawfields Presbyterian, organized in 1755. Samuel Scott and his wife, Nancy Bryan Scott were among the first to sign the church roll of Hawfields Presbyterian Church.

 

Significant Places of Worship

Hawfields Presbyterian Church

Hawfields Presbyterian Church

The Scott family, along with other Hawfields settlers, were instrumental in the forming of Hawfields Presbyterian Church. Samuel and Nancy Bryan Scott were names that appear on the first official role. From 1836 to the present, a member of each generation of the Scott family has served as an elder in the church.

Graham Presbyterian Church

Graham Presbyterian Church

As the Hawfields Community grew, the membership of Hawfields Presbyterian Church saw the need to create a second church to accommodate the expanding local population. Among those who loved Hawfields but chose to begin a second church near Graham, was John Scott, a brother of Henderson Scott. He and his wife, Margaret Anderson Scott left Hawfields where John was an elder and, according to family tradition, organized the Graham Presbyterian Church in his home. They became charter members of Graham Presbyterian Church when it was organized in 1850.

Mebane Presbyterian Church

Mebane Presbyterian Church

The Scott family assisted in the founding of the Mebanesville Presbyterian Church in 1868, now Mebane Presbyterian.  Lizzie Hughes Scott’s uncle, the Rev. Anderson Hughes, served as interim supply pastor for the new  while serving as pastor of Cross Roads Presbyterian and Hawfields Presbyterian churches.