Michael Graham Bible

An 18th Century Bible, belonging to Scott Family ancestor Michael Graham, was inherited by Margaret Graham Scott (1822-1892). Eventually this bible was donated to Washington & Lee University Library by the family of Anderson Hughes (Jim) Scott, in the early 1980’s. Brought from Ireland by Michael Graham, the bible was used by Rector William Graham, son of Michael, when he served as the University’s first Rector. In the days during and following the American Revolution, Washington & Lee University was known as Liberty Hall. The Michael Graham Bible was loaned to the Scott Collection for an exhibit which ran from September 17 – November 8, 2011. Graham descendants from across the southeast came to view the display.

Exhibition Dates: September – November 2011

The Hands that Held the Plow

“The Hands that Held the Plow” was an exhibit on two farmers, Howard Neese and Cecil Johnson who worked  diligently to farm and maintain the Kerr Scott farm as well as the Scott family farms. This display honored their lives and the service they gave to the Scott family.

Scott Clinic

Scott Clinic Exhibit

The Scott Clinic was built in 1949 in the Union Ridge area of Alamance County to serve northern Alamance County, southern Caswell County and surrounding counties. As a testament to the importance of the clinic to the community, the opening reception of the exhibition was attended by former staff members and families of those who had been served. The opening day ‘s events included weight and blood pressure checks conducted by ACC Nursing students, students from the Certified Nursing Assistant program, and Medical Assisting programs. On display were the Scott medical clinic supplies, accounting books, an original gurney, medical diplomas, and vintage medical paraphernalia. In addition, there were nurses’ uniforms on loan from the Watts School of Nursing. A book of memories was available for guests to record their memories of Dr. Floyd Scott and his sons at their clinic.

Exhibition Dates: September 2007–March 2008

Note:  This picture gallery originally created by Kassie Hudson and transferred to the new website.

Hopalong Cassidy

Hopalong Cassidy Exhibit

Hopalong Cassidy was a beloved Western cowboy hero from the 1930′s to the 1950′s whose films and television programs were enjoyed by millions of fans. From 1953 to 1959 he was spokesman for Melville Dairy, a Scott family business. While serving as spokesman, Hoppy’s image appeared on Melville Dairy glass bottles, milk cartons, and in local advertisements. In 1956, he was Grand Marshall for the Burlington Christmas Parade.

The Hopalong Cassidy exhibit opened to the public in February 2007. In addition to the featured collectibles on display, there was a life-sized stand up figure of Hoppy and his horse, Topper. On the opening day, former radio band, the “Rocky River Boys” played to the crowd of exhibit goers and dancers. A menu of chili and cornbread and other ‘cowboy fare’ was served to the crowd of over 200.

Among the collectibles on display for the exhibit were a camera, coloring books, puzzles, and board games. Autographed photos of Hopalong, watches, children’s sweaters and shirts, movie posters and other items were featured in this popular display. DVD’s of Hoppy’s western movies were shown in the auditorium, while a high school rodeo champion demonstrated his “roping” techniques to opening day visitors. On display also was a vintage bicycle in mint condition featuring handlebar ‘horns’, a saddle seat, and stirrup pedals.

Exhibition Dates: February 2007–July 2007